Ubud High

Life, News, Photography and Reviews from Ubud: The Apple of Bali's Eye

Indonesia: Alcohol Prohibition

So banning the sale of alcohol from everywhere in Indonesia except large supermarkets - a law that came into effect in April 2015 - was the thin end of the wedge.

Lawmakers approved a bill yesterday to ban alcohol from everywhere except 'some tourist spots' and 5-star hotels, and they aren't joking around. It's the brainchild of The National Development Party (PPP) and fellow Muslim-based Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) who propose that under the bill:

"... consuming alcoholic beverages could land a person in jail as it will be treated similarly to drug trafficking". And "a person under the influence of alcohol will face one-to-five years in jail for disturbing public order or for threatening the safety of others."

Progressive stuff. Good day's work there, boys.

Next blog post Next: Ubud ATM Fraud ~ Be Worried…

Travelling Indonesia

The finest travel-writing about Indonesia from Indoneo.com. Take your sandals for a walk...

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Trip over to Java, Bali's Big Auntie.

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